An Wu Jiang

Posted: 15 December, 2011 by Fairlane in strange
Tags: , , ,

An Wu Jiang

IMO: 7904865

Build: 1980 by HDW Kiel – Kiel in Germany, nr 151 as Jonny Wesch

At first glance, I thought this was just another rather pleasant looking general cargo vessel in the Chinese shipping fleet, that, like many others, has survived much longer than most of its contemporaries by sailing in East Asia. However, a closer inspection revealed an “ugly” truth, she isn’t just another general cargo vessel, instead, there’s something strange about her…

Maybe a few more angles from her different lives:

As Johnny Wesch

As Mistral

I think the problem is fairly clear. Who thought it was a good idea to install a pair of legs sticking up out of the deck? They’re even wearing tiny red shoes.

The”legs” however, it turns out are just heavy-lift Stülcken derricks, but on this design especially, they look like lower extremities, maybe its the Simpson’s skin tone to the whole thing.

And the legs have sisters…

An Tao Jiang

IMO:  7904877

Build: 1980 by HDW Kiel – Kiel in Germany, nr 154 as Magdalena Wesch

By Ralf Grabbert via http://www.vesseltracker.com

Sandra Wesch

IMO: 7812701

Build: 1979 by HDW Kiel – Kiel in Germany, nr 152

This well-used lady had a grand total of 15 different names (not including repeats) in her lifespan until being scrapped sometime in 2007.

Global Prince

IMO: 7812713

Build: 1980 by HDW Kiel – Kiel in Germany, nr 153 as Christian Wesch

She almost lived up to her above sister, with 11 different names up until her death in 2008.

By Frederico Bolognini via http://www.shipsotting.com

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Comments
  1. FOYEN says:

    That’s just a typical 1975 – 1980 freighter with a Stulken derrick!

  2. Fairlane says:

    Thank you for the info, a little era in cargo handling I didn’t know about.. However, it doesn’t make the appearance any less true, especially with the distinction this group attained by surviving into the current era with anachronistic lifting devices.

  3. Willi says:

    The Stulken mast is not the most attractive piece of deck equipment ever introduced for cargo handling however, it is practical and cost efficient compared to the Velle derrick and considerably less of a tangle to operate !

  4. It may be practical and efficient, but it still looks like a giant ballerina in red shoes crashed through the deck headfirst.

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