Dutch Runner

Posted: 19 November, 2009 by Fairlane in paintjob, ugly
Tags: , , , ,

Dutch Runner

IMO: 8712075

Build: 1988 at Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg in Germany, nr 892 as North King

I once remember watching a cartoon where Bugs Bunny inquires “Which way did he go George, which way did he go?” Why am I bringing this up, you may ask. Well the answer is, this vessel reminds re of that question. When you look at her from the side, your first thought may just be, “which end is the front?’

Given one judgement, she looks kind of like a small containership, with a tower accomodation far astern, or even the heavy lift vessel Tramper, featured here before.. However, like one of those visual riddles, if you change your perspective in the other direction, you see her actual identity.

What exactly she is, I’m not sure. Officially, she seems to be listed as a general cargo vessel. However, given some sources, and her stern ramp, she could also be a Ro/Ro freighter. Then there’s the cranes, which with the size of her, present the illusion of being a heavy lift freighter. Sounds to me like somebody just couldn’t make up their mind…

She also has one of those funnels that I just love, awkwardly protruding from one side, and in her case, painted white, like a giant tusk. Did she get in a fight with something and break off the other one?

And then there’s the color, a nice bright shade of putrid green. At one time she was a bit less repugnant, though.

While the blue does suit her a bit better, it still did little to hide her being one oddball little freighter.

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Comments
  1. bowsprite says:

    Argh! everything’s looking too beautiful to poke fun at. I think this is really enchanting. There isn’t a transvestite ship out there I don’t not like..do not don’t not like…no…

  2. tugster says:

    oddball–yes. ugly–nah. is it possible that all the existing UGLY vessels have been documented? to find more, we need to spread out across the continent and look in freshwater locations. would that require site namechange to uglyboats?

  3. alberto says:

    With a yellow sticker saying “chiquita” seem a giant banana not ready to be eat!!!!!!

  4. Mike says:

    The “Dutch Runner” was put onto the Labrador coast by CAI / David Chaulk, chartered of the “Dutch Runner”. It was certainly a bad move for the ship to be chartered by a company out of Moncton N.B. Chaulk Air Inc (CAI) and its CEO couldn’t have carried who captained the ship towards the last. Yes there was a few good captains that could really ship handle this ship alongside these incredibly small docks and Ro-Ro ramps. However the ship lost the contract not because it was somewhat slower speed wise, but the mates put onboard could not do the work because of the lack of knowledge needed to load and discharge the ship correctly. This lead to wrong stowage factors and handling the cargoes over much longer periods alongside each dock, or slipway. One Captain who’s name will not be mentioned at this time tried his damest to turn thing around, even to the point of instructing the mates on a correct stow. This “Dutch Runner” Captain worked his back side off and got little thanks for it from CAI’ David Chaulk. The Captain never relented until his term onboard ended in mid October having spent his entire time trying to make a failed system work, and might have succeeded if he had more time.

    The rest of the story saw a relief Captain that brought his 86 year old father onboard, as he did not know the Labrador Coast himself. This 86 year old man long retired was the new second mate, all be it for a short time. He departed the ship at Goosebay, and soon after this time the schedule went down hill like a lead balloon. I myself departed the ship shortly after the ship got back at Nova Scotia and said my good byes to all onboard, as I was not coming back no matter what. Our pays were played with and it was a on going issue with Great Lakes Feeder Lines Co and that of CAI. I understand that some of the crew are still fighting to get their money for both companies, as CAI took over the payroll on Nov 1st, as GLFLs no longer had an office in Burlington Ontario. Both GLFLs and CAI couldn’t have cared if we got off the ship when out time was up and caused hardships and bad feelings amongst the SIU and CAI employees who were also onboard during my time there.

  5. Scott says:

    I was just looking at the vessel in port hawkesbury, ns. shes docked at the warf looking a little worse for wear. the paint is pealed everywhere and it really looks as if shes been sent for scrap the way it sits. Very interesting ship. Id love to get on her and take some pictures.

  6. Mike says:

    Yesterday my ship (CSL) passed through the Canso Strait Nova Scotia where I am a crewman onboard. I saw again this old “Dutch Runner” now tied up at Port Hawkesbury in Cape Breton. My thoughts went back to the times I started working on the “Dutch Runner” carrying containers from Halifax to St. Pierre, later up into the Greats Lakes and once into the Arctic for a Desgagnes. Here to Desgagnes seen the “Dutch Runner” not what they hoped for. GLFL found them-selves having a bigger problem as they lost the Halifax to St. Pierre container contract. There was a scramble to find work for the ship and “Great Lakes Feeder Lines” started to have bigger problems until CAI got into view.

    As I stated in my last, she was not what she was that matter, but how she was manned played a greater operational prospective. We had crew / ship problems like all companies experienced, but never like it was when the “Dutch Runner” went onto the Labrador coast. Our Coastal Captain quite in Louisporte Newfoundland after having a very serious disagreement with CAI’s CEO and charterer in the Tim Horton coffee shop. This caused the Captain who advised GLFL’s that the ship was too big for some of the docks along this coast. Most seemly possible to approach in the night or leave from, due to the closeness navigation to the shoreline. This was due to the lack of, or no lighting seen established on these docks. Regolet dock was very worse and located at the mouth of the Inlet into Goose Bay’ Melville Bay . These docking along the Labrador coast where a nightmare for these most of these Captains, I am sure of. Here too the second Captain being a Russian / Canadian national quite shortly after joining. Followed by another who was replaced, as he too would not approach the docks or ramps at night. The schedule and back up cargo arriving in Louisporte caused bigger issues for the ship. The Newfoundland & Labrador cut the charterer’s contract rate and heard to be nearly in half. Soon after the still owner GLFL pulled the ship is what we all soon learned. Or was it the other way around ??

    All but one Captain who’s ship handling ability proved that this Captain had no problems with any of the docks or Ro Ro ramps, regardless as to where it was. This Captain’s incredible ship handling and seamanship kept the ship moving forward by day, or in the blackest of any night. Even with strong winds he did it like no others. He also showed mates and crew alike that cargo work could move better if stowage planning was met. This Cape Breton Captain I imagine is most likely retired by now. Therefore if you chance to come to read this Captain Kruger, I would like to say thank you Sir. For being the gentlemen and professional mariner you are and showed to me and all others onboard. Your longer hours given to help others to get the job completed safety, when we needed that experience. Thank you Capt.

  7. Mike says:

    Corrected & Added Text “Dutch Runner”

    Yesterday my ship (CSL) passed through the Canso Strait Nova Scotia where I am a crewman onboard. I saw again my old ship “Dutch Runner” now tied up at Port Hawkesbury in Cape Breton. My thoughts went back to the times I started working on the “Dutch Runner” carrying containers from Halifax to St. Pierre, later up into the Greats Lakes and once into the Arctic for a Desgagnes. Here to Desgagnes’s seen that the “Dutch Runner” not what they hoped for. GLFL found them-selves having a bigger problem as they lost the Halifax to St. Pierre container contract too. There was a scramble to find work for the ship and “Great Lakes Feeder Lines” started to have bigger problems until CAI got into view and bigger problems continued later on.

    As I stated in my last, she was not what she was that mattered, but how she was manned played a greater operational prospective. Yes, we had crew / ship problems like all companies experienced from time to time. But never like it was when the “Dutch Runner” went onto the Labrador coast. Our Coastal Captain quite in Louisporte Newfoundland after having a very serious disagreement with CAI’s CEO and charterer in the Tim Horton’s coffee shop. This caused the Captain who advised GLFL’s that the ship was too big for some of the docks along this coast. Most seemly impossible to approach at night or leave from, due to the close navigation to the shoreline, with wind & currents affected the performance of what he saw the ship capable of. This was due to the lack of, or no dock lighting seen established on these docks, and the weather was another good reason.

    The discharge port of Regolet located at the mouth of the Inlet into Goose Bay’s Melville Bay, is a dock that was the very worse of the worst. Here to the Captains had to navigate the ship extremely close between the dock, shoreline and the rocks just off the dock made matters worse. Leaving little room to maneuver, or to escape from if things went wrong. Not to be forgotten the wicked currents challenged these Captains ability, all be it docking only in the daylight hours. None as I remember it could approach, and all but one man did. These docking along the Labrador coast where a nightmare for the most part of these Captains, I am sure of. Here too the second Captain being a Russian / Canadian national quite shortly after joining. Followed by another who was replaced, as he too would not approach the docks or ramps at night. The schedule and back up cargoes arriving in Louisporte caused bigger issues for the ship. The Newfoundland & Labrador Government cut the charterer’s contract rate as we heard it to be nearly in half. Soon after the still owner at GLFL pulled the ship is what we all soon learned. Or was it the other way around??

    All but one Captain whose ship handling ability proved that this Captain had no problems with any of the docks, or Ro Ro ramps, regardless as to where it was day or night, wind or no wind. This Captain’s incredible ship handling and seamanship ability kept the ship moving forward by day, or in the blackest of any night. Even with strong winds or currents, he did it like no others until his departure in mid Oct of 2011. He also showed mates and crew alike that cargo work could move better, if more attention was given to the stowage planning and was met. This Cape Breton Captain I imagine is most likely retired by now. Therefore if you by chance to come to read this Captain Kruger, I would like to say thank you Sir. For being the gentlemen and professional mariner you are, and showed onto me and all others onboard for helping us as you did. Your longer hours given to help others, to get the job completed safety when we needed that experience.

    Thank you Capt.

  8. Chief Engineer John says:

    Hi Mike,

    I am interested to see you have sailed don this ship, it seems such a shame that a ship like this is tied up, neglected, going no where. What are these type of ship’s, or more specifically the Dutch Runner like in rough condition’s, I am a little intrigued as they look so top heavy when loaded up with cargo?

  9. Deb MacNeil says:

    As of today, Sept. 14/2016 this ship is still tied up at the Port Hawkesbury wharf. We have been looking at this rotting ship for a long time. Local news indicates that the port fees are being paid so the owners cannot be forced to move this monstrosity. There should be a time limit for how long a ship can be tied up at a small wharf.

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