Sea Raven

Posted: 12 January, 2010 by SeaBart in paintjob, ugly
Tags: , , ,

Sea Raven

IMO : 7806506

Build : 1941 by Weaver Shipyards – Galveston, Tx in the USA, nr’s 575 & 578

Converted : 1980 by Todd Shipyards Corp. –  Seattle, Wa in the U.S. of A., nr ? as Sea Skimmer

This yukkkie green tug was posted by Jim Kokosinski on our sadly underused by me site-extension on Facebook…Thanks for that Jim, I didn’t even realize things were happening there!

Duno source, via Facebook-extension

Anyway, when I started investigating this ugly pushertug I actually found out that she is quit interesting.

She has been assembled from 2 stern sections that where built in 1941 by Weaver Shipyards of Orange, Texas (hulls #575 and #578), they were ex-navy V-4 type tugs that where single screw with kort nozzles. These two were assembled together with a new hull forebody…..that all happened in 1980. Since then quit a bit of modification has been done to her and, Presto: an ugly ship is born!

Her 6th floor bridge extension deffo makes her ugly, and the vomit-green color does not help that image either!

Her smoke-stacks must, without a doubt, be the longest in the whole wide world…..btw: also not helping her looks!

Her is a pic from her as Sea Skimmer:

Please note the absence of the mile-long smoke-pipes!

Comments
  1. Mac Mackay says:

    I saw her as Dixie Commander in Tampa in 1992 nd she looked really good- can’t believe what they did to her!

  2. Fairlane says:

    I bet from the front the smokestacks look like they give the elevated bridge some little ears!

  3. Carey Akin says:

    I was Chief Engineer on this boat for many years. In fact, I took the bottom picture when she was painted red and didn’t have the extended stacks. One of the reasons that the stacks were extended was because in many conditions, the exhaust would get into the wheelhouse. The modification was made after I left. She was an odd boat, and sometimes a challenge to run, but will always hold a special place in my heart. She was scrapped a couple of years ago.

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